Dahaene-Nakamura-2010

Abstract: Young children often make mirror errors when learning to read and write, for instance writing their first name from right to left in English. This competence vanishes in most adult readers, who typically cannot read mirror words but retain […]

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Borst-Ahr-2015

Abstract: Mirror generalization is detrimental for identifying letters with lateral mirror-image counterparts (‘b/d’). In the present study, we investigated whether the discrimination of this type of letters in expert readers might be rooted in the ability to inhibit the mirror-generalization […]

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Parea-Moret-Tatay-2011

Abstract: Readers of the Roman script must “unlearn” some forms of mirror generalization when processing printed stimuli (i.e., herb and herd are different words). Here we examine whether the suppression of mirror generalization is a process that affects all letters […]

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Pegado-Nakamura-2014

A growing literature has been showing a profound impact of alphabetization at several levels of the visual system, including the primary visual cortex and higher-order ventral and dorsal visual areas. Importantly, in typical alphabetization courses, learning to read is not […]

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Kolinsky-Fernandes-2014

ABSTRACT Based on the neuronal recycling hypothesis (Dehaene & Cohen, 2007), we examined whether reading acquisition has a cost for the recognition of nonlinguistic visual materials. More specifically, we checked whether the ability to discriminate between mirror images, which develops […]

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Pegado-Nakamura-2014-2

Abstract The ability to recognize 2 mirror images as the same picture across left–right inversions exists early on in humans and other primates. In order to learn to read, however, one must discriminate the left–right orientation of letters and distinguish, […]

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Duñabeitia-Molinaro-2011

Abstract: At early stages of object identification we process correctly oriented and mirrored versions of an object similarly. However, in letter and word perception, such tolerance to mirror reversals is harmful for efficient reading. Do readers successfully develop blindness mechanisms […]

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Soares-Lages-2019

Abstract: Research has shown that recognizing words that contain reversal letters (e.g., b/d) is more difficult than recognizing words that do not contain them. Although none of the current computational models of visual word recognition can account for this effect, […]

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Fernandes-Leite-2017

Abstract: The relation between reversal errors (e.g., d for b, Я for R) and developmental dyslexia has been elusive. In this study, we investigated the roles of reading level, visual category, and orientation processing in this relation. Children with developmental […]

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