Cunningham-Perry-2002

Authors: Anne E. Cunningham, Kathryn E. Perry, Keith E. Stanovich, David L. Share.

Article: Orthographic learning during reading: examining the role of self-teaching.

Publication: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology (Elsevier). Volume 82, Issue 3, Pages 185-199 2002 | DOI: 10.1016/S0022-0965(02)00008-5

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Abstract

Thirty-four second grade children read target homophonic pseudowords (e.g., slurst/slirst) in the context of real stories in a test of the self-teaching theory of early reading acquisition. The degree of orthographic learning was assessed with three converging tasks: homophonic choice, spelling, and target naming. Each of the tasks indicated that orthographic learning had taken place because processing of target homophones (e.g., yait) was superior to that of their homophonic controls (e.g., yate). Consistent with the self-teaching hypothesis, we obtained a substantial correlation (r=.52) between orthographic learning and the number of target homophones correctly decoded during story reading. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that neither RAN tasks nor general cognitive ability predicted variance in orthographic learning once the number of target homophones correctly decoded during story reading had been partialed out. In contrast, a measure of orthographic knowledge predicted variance in orthographic learning once the number of targets correctly decoded had been partialed. The development of orthographic knowledge appears to be not entirely parasitic on decoding ability.

Tagged as: orthographic mapping, self-teaching, and sight words

Citation:

Anne E. Cunningham, Kathryn E. Perry, Keith E. Stanovich, David L. Share, Orthographic learning during reading: examining the role of self-teaching, Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, Volume 82, Issue 3,2002, Pages 185-199

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