Treiman-Pennington-2008

Authors: Treiman, R., Pennington, B. F., Shriberg, L. D., & Boada, R.

Article: Which children benefit from letter names in learning letter sounds?.

Publication: Cognition (Elsevier). 106(3), 1322–1338. 2008 | DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2007.06.006

[Full Text]

Abstract

Typical U.S. children use their knowledge of letters’ names to help learn the letters’ sounds. They perform better on letter sound tests with letters that have their sounds at the beginnings of their names, such as v, than with letters that have their sounds at the ends of their names, such as m, and letters that do not have their sounds in their names, such as h. We found this same pattern among children with speech sound disorders, children with language impairments as well as speech sound disorders, and children who later developed serious reading problems. Even children who scored at chance on rhyming and sound matching tasks performed better on the letter sound task with letters such as v than with letters such as m and h. Our results suggest that a wide range of children use the names of letters to help learn the sounds and that phonological awareness, as conventionally measured, is not required in order to do so.

Citation:

Treiman, R., Pennington, B. F., Shriberg, L. D., & Boada, R. (2008). Which children benefit from letter names in learning letter sounds?. Cognition106(3), 1322–1338. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2007.06.006

Tagged as: alphabet and letter names

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